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Historic Trails

If you are visiting New York City or are looking for a fun day hike for your troop, consider one of our Historic Trails. Both the Revolutionary War Historic Trail and the Old New York Historic Trails are open to any individual or group. Trail booklets and trail patches are available for sale.

2016-2017 Committee Leadership

Committee Chairman

 Mac Bradley

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Committee Adviser

 Patricia Bain

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Historic Trails Information

General Information

New York Historic TrailsThe Kintecoying Lodge #4 historical trails are open to any individual or group. We suggest that hikers be at least 10 years old. Youth groups must have at least two adult leaders. Large groups should have at least two adult leaders for every eight youth. Boy Scout and Girl Scout units are encouraged to walk the trail in uniform.

The cost of each trail is $3.50 per person. The fee, payable in advance, covers the cost of one trail booklet and one patch per person. These items will be sent to you upon receipt of your application and payment. These items are not sold separately! The minimum order is three sets of booklets and patches (per trail). Please allow two weeks for delivery.

Special offer: If you order sets for both trails at the same time, the price for the combined order is only $6.00 per person. (It is not possible to hike both trails in the same day.)

To order trail sets please complete the order form on the other side and mail it with your payment to:

Historical Trail Committee
Kintecoying Lodge #4, B.S.A.
c/o Patricia Bain, Adviser
445 East 86th Street, Apt. 1B
New York, NY 10028-6434

Please do not send cash. Make checks or money orders payable to: Greater New York Councils, B.S.A. or pay by credit or debit card.

Download the Historic Trails Order Form

The Old New York Historical Trail

New York City is the site of the oldest commercial center in the New World. The Dutch East India Company established a permanent settlement here in 1614. When the British took control in 1664, the settlement's name was changed from Nieuw Amsterdam to New York. With the American Revolution a new government came to the city and, on April 30, 1789, New York saw the inauguration of George Washington. The Erie Canal was opened in 1825 and New York's importance as a harbor grew with it. The turn of the 19th century was marked by massive immigration and great progress in industry. New York continues to grow as the commercial and cultural center of the United States. Located in lower Manhattan, "The Old New York Historical Trail" is a very popular walking tour rich in the history of New York and the entire country. Some areas included on the tour are:

This six to seven hour trail promises to be enjoyable and educational for all. Lunch may be purchased along the trail. We suggest you try a restaurant in Chinatown for an exceptional eating and cultural experience. You can also bring a bag lunch. There are restroom facilities in most public parks, some churches (if they are open) and the public piers at South Street Seaport. \

While you will be in the neighborhood, we recommend that you do not visit Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, the 9/11 Memorial Museum, or the Museum of the American Indian as you will not complete the trail the same day. These are worth another day trip.

The Revolutionary War Historical Trail

Located at the Northern tip of Manhattan in the Inwood-Washington Heights area, "The Revolutionary War Historical Trail" is a walking tour rich in the history of the early Dutch colonists, the American revolution, the city of New York, and the entire country. Some areas included on the tour are:

This four to five hour trail promises to be enjoyable and educational for all. It includes climbing numerous steps and is somewhat hilly in parts. There are some areas along the trail where lunch may be purchased. Washington Heights has an abundance of Dominican cafés that you may want to visit for an exceptional eating and cultural experience. Spanish is the dominant (or only) language spoken in some of the cafés. You can also bring a bag lunch to be eaten in any of the parks. There are restroom facilities in Inwood Hill Park and Highbridge Park that are open to the public.

We suggest that you do not stop at the Cloisters as you will not finish the trail the same day. The Cloisters is worth its own day trip.

Notes for Both Trails

We advise you to purchase a Kappa Map Group map of Manhattan or use a mapping application on a smart-phone or tablet. There is no need to register for a date to walk either trail. Please observe these guidelines:

  1. BSA units are reminded to complete a Tour and Activity Plan before this or any other trip, other than trips to their council's camps.
  2. The trails should be walked in groups of no more than 10 people. Youth groups must have at least two adult leaders for every eight youth. The 10 person limit will help prevent congestion at some points along the trails.
  3. The trails visit places where people live, work and worship. Your group's behavior will affect those who walk the trails after you.

 

Last Updated on Monday, 15 August 2016 22:04

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